Page 1 of 1

B.S. and M.Sc. Jobs for Ph.D.

PostPosted: Tue Oct 05, 2004 11:53 am
by C. Blinx
How does it look for a Ph.D. if he/she chooses to apply for a position that is meant for M.Sc. or B.S. specially in biotech companies? Do they take the application seriously? Do they ever hire these kind of Ph.D. for lower skills positions? Does it have any negative impact(s) on the applicant's CV later on?
Thanks,
Robert

B.S. and M.Sc. Jobs for Ph.D.

PostPosted: Tue Oct 05, 2004 4:05 pm
by Dave Jensen
Hi Robert,

That is an exercise in futility. Companies have specific levels of education requirements in certain jobs because the jobs are fine-tuned to those requirements, and someone who has a PhD would be deemed "over-qualified" and the company would see this person as a bad hire. If you stick with PhD positions, you'll find that your career will develop much better in the long term. Occasionally, I've seen people land a job doing a BS level work with a PhD and sure enough, the company is generally right -- that person leaves shortly down the road, a dissatisfied employee looking for a job that makes him or her satisfied. It also looks bad on the resume or CV,


Dave Jensen, Moderator
CareerTrax Inc.

B.S. and M.Sc. Jobs for Ph.D.

PostPosted: Wed Oct 06, 2004 12:47 pm
by Anna
What about those jobs that state the "minimum" requirements are a BS or MS. Does this mean they will entertain Ph.D. applicants? I've come across some positions in which the description seems suited for a Ph.D. and the salary as well. Does one apply to such positions or write them off?

B.S. and M.Sc. Jobs for Ph.D.

PostPosted: Wed Oct 06, 2004 2:17 pm
by Dave Jensen
Hello Anna,

Personally, if I were a PhD, I would not want a position that is below my level of education. A job that is for a BS level person is just not the level of job that I would apply for. And employers know that -- if they put in a 'min level BS' they are going to lose at least 60% of their PhD applicants. SO -- why would they do this? There are two reasons.

For one, it could be a company that is really trying to fill the job with a BS level person, but they'll take anything they can get.

In other positions, it may be a company that has a job like a Sales Rep position, for example, that could be filled legitimately by any degree level. If you have a desire to DO THAT JOB, than by all means apply. (A PhD level salesperson in a company selling reagents, instruments, etc, is often seen at the $100K salary level in a good market like SFO, Boston, San Diego, DC, etc -- so there may be reasons why that job appeals!).

Anna, the long and the short of it is that if you have an interest in the type of job described, send a resume. Just remember that advertised jobs are less than half of the positions available, so you've really got a lot of work to do in the networking department in order to find that other 60% or more of the jobs,


Dave Jensen, Moderator
CareerTrax Inc.

along these lines.....

PostPosted: Thu Oct 07, 2004 12:58 pm
by Julie
I\'ll soon be a PhD who spent her graduate career studying fruit flies. Even the \"postdoc\" job listings I\'ve seen with companies only want PhD students who have worked in mice. Is my only option to get an academic postdoc in mice and then look for an industry job? Is there any chance I can convince a company that I\'ll be able to pick up the new skills quickly?

along these lines.....

PostPosted: Thu Oct 07, 2004 3:09 pm
by Dave Jensen
Hi Julie,

Along the way you've developed transferable skills. You'll need to remember these . . . Companies are not just interested in the system you worked in, they are interested in what you can do with the variety of skills that you've put under your belt in the meanwhile. Impress them with your creativity, your thinking power. As one hiring manager told me recently,

"Get me someone with good critical thinking skills. I don't care if they've worked with [their system] or not, I just need someone who can think on their feet and who I can trust will approach the work with an open mind."

This fellow's unusual, but you'll find many people who think this way. Continue to push forward, stessing more than just your work with fruit flies,

Dave