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An interesting article

PostPosted: Fri Oct 15, 2004 3:52 pm
by Dave Jensen
The following link will be interesting to anyone considering biotechnology as a career choice. Often, the effect of biotechnology companies in a given region is overestimated by politicians and the lay press. Reading this article will give you a good idea of salaries, numbers of future employees, etc, in one of our nation's top bio-cluster regions.

Seattle Times Article

An interesting article

PostPosted: Fri Oct 15, 2004 5:17 pm
by John G.
Very good piece. One strange comment from the hiring manager at the Seattle Biomedical Institute, however, mentioning postdoc salaries go as high as $76,000. If I ever heard a load of bull, that would be it.

JG

An interesting article

PostPosted: Mon Oct 18, 2004 1:37 pm
by A. Sam
People are at a loss to point to just where any new jobs will come from and what are the emerging growth industries. With a shrug we can offer up biotech. It is a great industry that's here to stay but it sure won't be able to replace any jobs that have been sent overseas. An important question for which there doesn't appear to be any answers is: what can the students and the unemployed of today do to prepare for a secure and good-paying career?

An interesting article

PostPosted: Mon Oct 18, 2004 7:11 pm
by Dave Jensen
Sam,

I agree that there aren't a lot of answers to the question of "what can you do to prepare for a secure and good-paying career" . . . The biotech industry, and the life sciences in general, seem to me to be very good long-term career areas, but they certainly will have their own ups and downs. You never know what is going to be "hot" in the sciences. It's a real up and down scenario, based upon your specialty.

I don't know how jobs in bioscience research could get outsourced -- do you think this could happen? I can definitely see manufacturing plants and distribution points around the world taking jobs away from the USA, but it is really hard to do quality R&D in some of those off-shore environments.

Or am I wrong -- other thoughts? Maybe I am too optimistic


Dave

An interesting article

PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2004 2:02 pm
by A. Sam
Guess I got off subject a little. Since the US is the major driver of new innovations that ultimately get outsourced once they're routine, I guess it's tempting to speculate what the next generation industry will be. Sorry, not really relevant here. Except for in the sense that yes, I presume that a lot of biotech R and D will be done overseas soon. What's the situation now: most new biopharm innovations that hit the market were in-licensed or purchased by the producer. In-house R and D is often a secondary source of leads at best. There are dozens of large contract labs across the country who offer contract research services that can start as far upstream as discovery. I don't see any reason why all this work couldn't be done overseas with sufficient supervision. We've begun developing drugs that originated overseas and the economics of it are a slam dunk. I usually advise college kids to consider careers in business or finance.