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reason for leaving

Postby YAG » Tue May 05, 2015 2:06 pm

I was laid off from a horrible work environment, for what I see as a made up reason, so that people who didn't do their jobs can blame a scapegoat and keep their reputations. I can say that in my next interview, or say something nice and pleasant along the lines of "I believe I can be a better fit elsewhere, and this is a position/industry where I would be able to use my talents to a fuller extent."

Is this a question that requires elaboration, or is it something best answered by a template answer and move on?
YAG
 
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Re: reason for leaving

Postby Rich Lemert » Tue May 05, 2015 4:02 pm

I was laid off ... for what I see as a made up reason, so that people who didn't do their jobs can blame a scapegoat and keep their reputations.


The minute you make a statement like this is the moment that you completely sink your chances of obtaining the job for which you are interviewing. Whether or not the statement is true, it tells the person interviewing you that you are not willing to accept responsibility for your actions and quick to blame your co-workers. You've essentially painted yourself with the same brush you just used to describe your former colleagues.


I believe I can be a better fit elsewhere, and this is a position/industry where I would be able to use my talents to a fuller extent.


The problem with this statement is that it implies that you left the position of your own free will, which is not what I get from your description. This is too likely to come back when your potential new employer checks your employment history, and they're probably going to wonder what else you're hiding.


The best approach, in my opinion, is to acknowledge the reality (I was laid off), but don't dwell on it. These days people know that layoffs happen to even the best of us, and they don't necessarily reflect on the performance of the person laid off. Acknowledge that it happened, then move the conversation back to a focus on the position for which you are applying.


Be careful, though, that you aren't saying "laid off" when you really mean "fired" - hiring managers will quickly figure out which applies to you. If you were fired, the best policy is still to acknowledge the fact, then briefly explain what you've learned from the experience. ("My boss and I didn't agree on the direction the group was taking, and I guess I was not as tactful about my position as I should have been.")
Rich Lemert
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Re: reason for leaving

Postby YAG » Tue May 05, 2015 11:42 pm

Rich Lemert wrote:
I was laid off ... for what I see as a made up reason, so that people who didn't do their jobs can blame a scapegoat and keep their reputations.


The minute you make a statement like this is the moment that you completely sink your chances of obtaining the job for which you are interviewing. Whether or not the statement is true, it tells the person interviewing you that you are not willing to accept responsibility for your actions and quick to blame your co-workers. You've essentially painted yourself with the same brush you just used to describe your former colleagues.


I believe I can be a better fit elsewhere, and this is a position/industry where I would be able to use my talents to a fuller extent.


The problem with this statement is that it implies that you left the position of your own free will, which is not what I get from your description. This is too likely to come back when your potential new employer checks your employment history, and they're probably going to wonder what else you're hiding.


The best approach, in my opinion, is to acknowledge the reality (I was laid off), but don't dwell on it. These days people know that layoffs happen to even the best of us, and they don't necessarily reflect on the performance of the person laid off. Acknowledge that it happened, then move the conversation back to a focus on the position for which you are applying.


Be careful, though, that you aren't saying "laid off" when you really mean "fired" - hiring managers will quickly figure out which applies to you. If you were fired, the best policy is still to acknowledge the fact, then briefly explain what you've learned from the experience. ("My boss and I didn't agree on the direction the group was taking, and I guess I was not as tactful about my position as I should have been.")


I had wanted to leave that place for a long time. the only reason I stayed was because I wanted to make some positive changes, and leave on good terms, but the nature of the work environment made progress impossibly slow. when they blamed me for the lack of progress, that was the last straw for me. I don't want to use "fired" because I think it automatically insinuates incompetence, and unless the person has been through a similar situation, I don't think I will get much sympathy. Leaving the place on my own has always been the plan, as I never had any intention of staying in the industry.
YAG
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2014 1:06 pm

Re: reason for leaving

Postby Cory » Wed May 06, 2015 12:13 pm

To be clear...

If you were asked to leave under any performance claim (valid or not) - you were fired.

If you were asked to leave due to resource constraint or business reorganization - you were laid off.

Make sure the situation matches what you tell people.

Cory
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Re: reason for leaving

Postby John D. D, » Sat May 30, 2015 7:56 pm

Great question! And I am going to
give a counterargument to what has
been posted above.

Take the upper road. Stop the
rumor mill, and propagation of
negative stuff. Go with your polite
statement, and focus on the science
you can bring to the project at
hand, and the work environment that
you would like to be a part of.
Put some thought into the project
ahead of time, offer to undergo some
independent assessments of ability...
And move on without dragging your
past with you. If possible, always
maintain a positive relationship (be
able to greet and converse cordially)
with people you have left, even if
you were laid off or fired. People
do change.
John D. D,
 
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