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Re: colleague does not accept linkedIn invitation

PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 2015 11:39 am
by Kevin Foley
Hi Dave!

Clearly I'd make a terrible recruiter!

Re: colleague does not accept linkedIn invitation

PostPosted: Thu Sep 17, 2015 8:41 am
by NKC
I may have missed this in the comments, but why not grab coffee with them one day or in passing at some point say "hey hows it going", followed by small talk of some sort, and finish the conversation with "oh by the way I sent you a linked in invitation the other day because I really wanted to make sure that I can keep up with you in the future. You've been a great collegue to work with."

Don't sit around and speculate, dont take it personal, and for goodness sake go out and work those people skills!

Re: colleague does not accept linkedIn invitation

PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2015 5:49 pm
by Dustin Levy
Colleague or not, I am much more likely to accept an invite from someone who writes a personal message as part of their invitation, instead of the standard "I'd like to add you to my professional network" message. Stating why you would like to connect, and/or what's in it for the other person if they connect with you, represents a higher level of initial engagement and can set you up for a more meaningful networking relationship.

Re: colleague does not accept linkedIn invitation

PostPosted: Tue Oct 06, 2015 3:08 pm
by I.K.K.
I couldn't agree more with Dustin. I'm amazed how many people send "stock" LinkedIn invites. I don't even do that with close colleagues.

Re: colleague does not accept linkedIn invitation

PostPosted: Tue Oct 06, 2015 4:07 pm
by Dave Jensen
I.K.K. wrote:I couldn't agree more with Dustin. I'm amazed how many people send "stock" LinkedIn invites. I don't even do that with close colleagues.


Unfortunately, Linkedin makes it TOO easy to send those lousy, stock invitations. They'll show you a list of people, and you know some of them. It's easy to just click on "Connect" but unfortunately, that sends out the stock verbiage that no one likes. You must click on the photo of the person and go to that person's profile, and then custom-craft an invite.

This will work twice as well or more than simply clicking "connect."

Dave

Re: colleague does not accept linkedIn invitation

PostPosted: Tue Oct 06, 2015 8:15 pm
by P.C.
I have a high contempt for Linkedn, Facebook and these useless temporary fads.
If you want a recommendation from a person, the way I understand it is you talk face to face or on the phone. Face to face is better to
avoid misunderstandings.
Linkedn and these other fads mean little . To me real networking means personal face to face interactions , possibly reinforced over the phone.
These new fangled computer connections are highly, highly overated.

Re: colleague does not accept linkedIn invitation

PostPosted: Thu Oct 08, 2015 12:24 pm
by Kevin Foley
P.C. wrote:I have a high contempt for Linkedn, Facebook and these useless temporary fads... These new fangled computer connections are highly, highly overated.


I'm posting that comment on Facebook as my "Quote of the Day" (where it will live on in cyberspace with a half-life of at least 40,000 years! ;-)

In all seriousness, LinkedIn and other online social networking tools are valuable as long as you use them in the right way. What the right way is depends on exactly what you are trying to accomplish.

It is certainly true that many online resources are used in the wrong way by many of their users. Classic example: spending all day every day online job hunting on Monster.com et al., rather than the much more difficult face-to-face networking that leads to many more actual job offers in the real world.

Online can't and shouldn't replace other more personal forms of networking, but it does have a significant benefit if used effectively.

Re: colleague does not accept linkedIn invitation

PostPosted: Fri Oct 09, 2015 9:44 am
by P.C.
I agree that my comments were slightly over the top... but hyperbole did seem appropriate at the time. Apparently it was effective.
Even cold calling, for networking purposes, as it has been discussed numerous times on this forum, and the web site, seems more effective than cold Linkedln.