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Breaking the Ice with New Acquaintances at Social Events

PostPosted: Thu Jul 07, 2016 2:04 pm
by Dave Jensen
This is always hard for me, and many of the scientists who read this forum have indicated it is also a concern for them.

Here's an article which talks about some great ways to break the ice, with actual specific examples of what you might say at an event where you're standing around with a glass of wine and no one to talk to. Has this happened to you?

Dave Jensen

http://www.standard.co.uk/lifestyle/london-life/the-17-best-icebreakers-to-use-at-a-party-where-you-dont-know-anyone-a3286126.html

Re: Breaking the Ice with New Acquaintances at Social Events

PostPosted: Thu Jul 07, 2016 4:58 pm
by Dick Woodward
I look for someone else standing around with a glass of wine, say hello and introduce myself. Depending on the venue, the next thing can be "what brings you here?", "what is your particular area of interest?", "what do you think of this party?, or something else that seems appropriate. They are probably as interested as you in having someone to talk to - it really isn't that difficult.

I'm not sure about the "shoes" question in the article, however. Might work for the ladies (probably would, from what I can discern), but for gentlemen, perhaps a comment on the necktie would be a bit more appropriate...

Dick

Re: Breaking the Ice with New Acquaintances at Social Events

PostPosted: Mon Jul 11, 2016 9:05 am
by D.X.
Ahh..the gift of gab.

Something I use to be good at but lost over time. And something I've learned is once you lose it, beleive it not, you have to re-learning it!

It becomes all weird again, thanks for the refresher.

Don't know about the shoes one. And I guess there is the risk of being persceived as creepy that I guess should be managed. i.e. "how yooouuu doing?" or maybe I'm just creepy in General.

dx

Re: Breaking the Ice with New Acquaintances at Social Events

PostPosted: Mon Jul 11, 2016 9:08 am
by Dustin Levy
For the readers or audiobook lovers out there, "The Fine Art of Small Talk" is something I recommend on this topic as this is something that doesn't come naturally to me.

https://www.amazon.com/Fine-Art-Small-T ... 1401302262

One recommendation from the book that I found helpful was to seek out the person who is standing alone and "rescue" them rather than trying to break into a group conversation that's already ongoing. If that person wanted to be rescued, you'll have a good conversation and the experienced networkers in the room will eventually gravitate to the two of you. If the person turns out to be a dud, the book also talks about how to exit the conversation, or lack thereof, gracefully.