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Science Careers Meeting in Houston -- Today!

PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 2017 4:25 am
by Dave Jensen
Please join us for a seminar and workshop today at MD Anderson and UT Health in Houston, Texas!

"Street Savvy Science: The Unwritten Rules of the Road for Science Careers"

The term “Street Savvy” derives from a term that the speaker has used in numerous columns and AAAS Science published booklets over the years. After 30 years of working closely with scientists and scientific leaders/directors, Dave Jensen has found that there’s a specific set of skills necessary to succeed in one’s career that are not taught at the University – those who have found and developed these skills are “street savvy” and enjoy a much larger pool of opportunities.

While the University trains technical staff to deal with problems in unique ways, helping them develop into independent thinkers, the academic track actually creates a box that can be difficult to get out of when it comes to the career. Outside of this box of rigorous academic training lies a world of job opportunities that are reached only via a specific process, one that is quite different than the success factors behind an academic career. As a result of a completely different rulebook in use by industry, it’s very possible for those coming out of their graduate degrees or postdocs to miss out on opportunities that could very well be a part of their future career horizon.

Simply put, it’s necessary to combine a person’s strong academic training with a set of skills that are much closer to street lessons than learnings from textbooks. Over hundreds of columns spanning more than 20 years, Jensen has written about these key pieces of advice that come from those who have already passed through the academia-to-employment chokepoint. In this presentation, the speaker will discuss the current situation in the science job market and where it might go in the next five years, and then focus in on a half-dozen aspects of these different “rules” in use by employers and successful job seekers.

Throughout his talk, Jensen will describe the backgrounds and methods of “street savvy” scientists who have moved past their academic training into careers of many different kinds. The presentation will integrate the skills needed while in the job market with the entire process of developing a career, creating a "career success" slant as opposed to a presentation that talks about CV’s and resumes.

This event is at 1PM and is open to anyone in the Houston area. An earlier workshop on Thursday with Mr. Jensen has already been booked up and is no longer available to new attendees.

No advance registration is required --- refreshments will be served. Come by if you are in the area, please. All attendees will receive the new AAAS Science Careers booklet with the latest collection of materials about career choices.

Location Information:
UTHealth - Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences - Mitchell Building (BSRB) (View Map)
6767 Bertner Avenue
Houston, TX 77030

Re: Science Careers Meeting in Houston -- Today!

PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 2017 9:55 am
by Nate W.
Dave, Wished you would have posted the meeting earlier; I would have attended. Next time, you come to the Lone Star, please post the meeting earlier. It is a big state.

You should come speak in Dallas or Austin. I know there are students and scientists struggling to these Texas cities. Here in N. Texas, we have many spin-off biotech launch their operations here and then move to a larger biotech. There have been over 16 biotech start-ups launched in the last 15 years in the Dallas metroplex that have failed, been bought-out, or relocated to biotech hub cities, like San Francisco. Further, we have some start-ups here with a bare bones headquarters in Dallas but their main R&D operations are located elsewhere.

Re: Science Careers Meeting in Houston -- Today!

PostPosted: Thu Apr 06, 2017 12:05 pm
by Dave Jensen
Thanks Nate. In many ways, a lot like Arizona. It's almost as if States that didn't get started "early" in biotech (1970's early 80's) have a very hard time catching up,

Dave