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Postdoct Research in Neurodegeneration

PostPosted: Wed Dec 15, 2004 12:06 am
by Park
Does anybody know or have information about the future of this kind of research in academic or industry?
I do not hope it is hot as stem cell. But I do not hope there is no market at all, either.

Postdoct Research in Neurodegeneration

PostPosted: Wed Dec 15, 2004 8:56 am
by Don
Park,

This is a hot area at least in industry. Anyone working in ALS, Parkinsons, Alzheimers, etc. is working on neurodegeneration. If I were you and I wanted to go into industry, I would check out what you think are the best papers in that area that have an industry person in the author list and then figure out a way to meet that person (at a meeting, seminar, cold call, etc.). You need to begin networking with these people. I wont go into the details of networking as others on this forum are much better at the ideas than I am. Maybe Dave Jensen (the networking Guru here - and a real authority on networking among scientists if you ask me) could point you in the right direction.

Cheers,

Don

Postdoct Research in Neurodegeneration

PostPosted: Wed Dec 15, 2004 9:48 pm
by Park
Thank you very much for your message. Why it is so important to find a position in industry through networking? Can't it be simple to just apply to the people who is looking for Postdoct in industry, just like in academic?

Postdoct Research in Neurodegeneration

PostPosted: Thu Dec 16, 2004 9:34 am
by Don
That is a good question. Rather than give you my take on it, you should take a look at the archives of this forum.

My guess is that threads about networking probably represent a disproportionate amount of the discussions here (and on other sites). For many scientists it is one of the most vexing parts of finding their first (and often subsequent) job(s). It is something that is not taught in school and something that seems daunting to many people. "How do I network", "what defines networking", "isnt that just brown-nosing", "wont that annoy people"; the reactions are predictable.

The short answer is that networking is not just a means to an end (getting your first job), it is a terribly important skill you will need throughout your career. While I am not an academic, I would venture that it is a very important skill in that arena as well - most of the very successfull academics I know have terrific networks.

Look through the archives for this site and you will see a lot of advice on networking.

Hopefully someone better at describing how one networks will chime in here. Dave?

D