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Time frame for job search

PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2005 5:49 pm
by ridge
Hello Everyone:

In the previous threads it has been highlighted that we need to have a plan of action in our job search. I was wondering if anyone could advise regarding when to start looking for a job...I am graduating in november with a PhD in engineering..so if I start applying for jobs from now is too early or is it late?
*How will the industry react to a resume that has an expected graduation date over 9 months?

Please advise..
Thanks

Time frame for job search

PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2005 6:15 pm
by Andy
Ridge,

Now is the time to make contacts. Don't approach people "looking for a job" right now, or ever for that matter. Build connections. Try to go to a meeting this year and meet scientists there. Most hiring managers, upon seeing that you expect to graduate in 9 months, will assume you'll be done anywhere between 12-15 months.

Best of luck to you,

Andy

Time frame for job search

PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2005 6:27 pm
by Dave Jensen
Hi Ridge,

I second Andy's comments. Now is the time to start thinking about it, to start preparing the way for your job search by making contacts. However, hiring managers in industry work on more of a 4-6 month window. When they are SURE you'll be available in 90 days or so, you'll get phone interviews from mailed CV's, etc. But you won't have to do a whole lot of that if you start on a strategy right now.

Dave Jensen, Moderator

Time frame for job search

PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2005 7:01 pm
by Val
ridge wrote:

> How will the industry react to a resume that has an expected graduation date over 9 months?

Uh... what you need is to make contacts with some people in industry and talk to them about job opportunities and probably run your CV past them. Their interest or the lack of interest will give you a feel if that particular industry is hot for hiring now. (In fact, what you really need now is the feel of security which arises from your realisation that you will get a job soon after graduation.) Besides, you may strike a correspondence with some of the industrial people who will get interested in your skills... you may get a job with them later.

From the point of view of the hiring manager, 9 months is a too long period to incorporate you into his plans of production.

Regards,
Val