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University and Career search

Postby ranu » Sat Feb 19, 2005 3:22 pm


I use to go to Mcmaster University and now I am planning to transfer to York. I am enrolled in science at Mac. Does it really make any difference which university you go to. Some universities may have big names and some are actually very good. But I realized that I rather finish 3-4yrs of undergraduate studies at york in science and engineering (science). I was wondering if a major in Biology is good choice because i heard that according to the Government of Canada Biology falls under the National Occupation Classfication. What science jobs get high salaries now and are a big demand today? Where can I find information on jobs along with their salaries. Is biotechnology a good career to get into now? I am just a first year student and Im not sure how it is? After finishing a degree do you then do your masters in whatever direction you want to get into??

Also I want to know why does London UK have a system where after highschool you can get into medical school. Because i have a friend in medical school and he is only 18 like me. Why is it not like that in Canada?
ranu
 
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University and Career search

Postby MPB » Sat Feb 19, 2005 3:51 pm


Alisa:

I would say that there are basically 4 things that most people with an undergrad degree in the life sciences do: medicine, academic research, industrial research, and "something else." Something else encompasses a lot of jobs that you could do with a background in biological science, like [to name just a couple], teaching or journalism. It would be helpful for your long-term career to think about which way you want to go as early as possible.

For both academic and industrial research, really the "professional" degree is the PhD. You could find a job with a master's degree at an academic institution or a company, but you would probably never rise to the upper levels of management, and you would always be basically a lab technician. Many people do this for their entire career and are perfectly happy, others want to be in charge.

In terms of changing schools then, the question should be which would best prepare you for your long-term career goal? If you want to go to grad school, which will give you the most research opportunities as an undergrad, and provide access to professors who are better positioned to help you get into a good graduate program? To make it as PhD, however, you really need to have a passion for science and a lot of discipline and inner strength. Especially in academics, good top-level positions are very difficult to come by and require years of dedication, training, and good mentorship. Too often, undergraduates don't think about their long-term goals and prospects, end up going to grad school "by default" because they don't know what else to do, and then have trouble finding a good position later.






MPB
 
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Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2012 11:28 pm

University and Career search

Postby ranu » Sun Feb 20, 2005 2:02 pm

Thankyou mpb for your advice. I was just wondering why alot of people go to London to do MEdicine. Is it different there? Because one of my friends is in medical school and he is only 18.
The degree that I am doing is a Bachelor in science : Major Biology. Its about 3-4yrs
Career options like Cell biologist, Geneticist, Pharmacologist, Molecular biologist,forensic science...Do they normally require more than just a BSc. in science?
Normally after an individual finishes there degree does a job easily pop up or I guess it takes more . When you finished your degree how did you find a job ? Does University help or give you some options or councelling. I know im young and I have yet more to learn. I also heard that getting into co-op is a great opportunity to develop those skills and direct you to a better career search. Before I really wanted to do medicine. I was thinking London UK is probably the best place. I do have an interest in forensic science now. There is alot of science career options that are arising and its quite difficult to make that decision. Thanks
ranu
 
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Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2012 11:29 pm

University and Career search

Postby MPB » Sun Feb 20, 2005 2:13 pm


In the US (and Canada, I suppose), most people who study medicine first get a 4-year undergraduate degree; usually in some biological science, although you can go to med school with any undergrad degree, in theory. From what I understand (maybe some Europeans will correct me), in Europe, most people who study medicine do not get a separate undergrad degree. Instead, they enroll in a 6-year course of study that sort of combines what we think of as undergrad and med school in one program. I believe that there are a few similar programs in North America. There are also some combined undgrad and med school programs (at NYU, for example) but you go through both degree programs and it's 8 years (the advantage is that you are accepted to both undergrad and med school at the same time).

I don't really know much about employment at the BS level with a biology degree. I'm sure there are some lab tech jobs, or maybe working in medical publishing, or something like that. To attain any kind of supervisory position you would probably need at least a master's degree, and to run a lab you would need a Ph.D.

Your school should have some counseling services. Also, just ask some of your professors.

MPB
 
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Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2012 11:28 pm


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