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Millenials in the Workplace

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Re: Millenials in the Workplace

Postby D.X. » Thu Aug 02, 2018 2:10 am



Hi Andrew,

Sure, but I think it also depends on sector and sub-sector, and to a limited extent geography. This behavior does not happen per se on the commericial side of pharma where i sit. Jobs are few compared to job-seeking market, its an employer's market not employees. Plus the market profile for job seekers are highly specialized and skilled. I would say same for Pre-clinical and manufacturing side of R&D - Ph.D.s who have direct experience in-house pharma Drug Discovery or direct experience Technical Production or Industry Operations - super highly skilled folk and not so many jobs.

So for a young newbie PhD to even get a shot to interview for say a Technical Production or Quality role at Big Pharma Inc. - I highly doubt they won't be showing up...if anything i bet they'll be there 1 hour early!

There are other sectors that are churn of the mill, that don't required super specialized or super skilled employees as compared to say what's needed for being a Non-clinical Pharmacologist or Toxicologist responsible for data generation and collation into an IND submission vs. call center person. No to deminish call center folk but you get the point.

Millenial or not, they'll be at the interview on my side of the sector, even for short-term trainee positions.

DX
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Re: Millenials in the Workplace

Postby Dave Jensen » Thu Aug 02, 2018 11:18 am

What Andrew mentions is a real problem. While I haven't seen it in the same degree that the article talks about, I've seen it in short stays in companies. For some reason, it's OK to just move on in three or four months if you don't like the atmosphere or culture, instead of digging in and trying to make the best of it. Short stays STILL don't look good on CV's, but people are more willing to take the risk.

It's sad -- companies aren't willing to invest in on the job training any longer, which they used to do because people spent many years in their employ, and employees aren't willing to go through a "process" of getting acclimated to the new environment of a company. If they don't sense a promotion coming immediately, or if there is a hiccup with a new boss, they're willing to just jump ship.

Recruiters are rethinking their guarantee policies now as a result of this tendency -- With the trend to just jump ship, the old six month or one year guarantees (with a full replacement search at no charge) look risky.

Dave
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Re: Millenials in the Workplace

Postby D.X. » Fri Aug 03, 2018 3:12 am

Dave Jensen wrote:
Recruiters are rethinking their guarantee policies now as a result of this tendency -- With the trend to just jump ship, the old six month or one year guarantees (with a full replacement search at no charge) look risky.

Dave


REALLY??? 6 month or 1 year guarantee?! Oh my. By me its probabation completion, 3 months in general. Maybe you can try that as your milestone for guarantee?

That way you have documentation that Hiring Manager is happy, HR is happy..etc. For example, we have to fill a probation completion form with the boss that is then submitted to HR documenting that the employee has completed probation period and is officially a fixed FTE.and official contractual notification period then kicks in.

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Re: Millenials in the Workplace

Postby Dave Jensen » Fri Aug 03, 2018 4:43 pm

D.X. wrote:
Dave Jensen wrote:
Recruiters are rethinking their guarantee policies now as a result of this tendency -- With the trend to just jump ship, the old six month or one year guarantees (with a full replacement search at no charge) look risky.

Dave


REALLY??? 6 month or 1 year guarantee?! Oh my. By me its probabation completion, 3 months in general. Maybe you can try that as your milestone for guarantee?

That way you have documentation that Hiring Manager is happy, HR is happy..etc. For example, we have to fill a probation completion form with the boss that is then submitted to HR documenting that the employee has completed probation period and is officially a fixed FTE.and official contractual notification period then kicks in.

DX


We've had a one-year guarantee for 30 years and had to invoke it perhaps twice. But in today's market, it no longer makes sense. 90 days might be what a contingent recruiter would use.

Dave
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Re: Millenials in the Workplace

Postby E.K.L. » Fri Aug 03, 2018 5:22 pm

Dave Jensen wrote:It's sad -- companies aren't willing to invest in on the job training any longer, which they used to do because people spent many years in their employ, and employees aren't willing to go through a "process" of getting acclimated to the new environment of a company. If they don't sense a promotion coming immediately, or if there is a hiccup with a new boss, they're willing to just jump ship.


Dave

I'd say training is an important factor, but it's not only the quality & amount of training, but also the way you train your employee. E.g. the first company I've worked at I was assigned a 'mentor' during training (a bit like the old apprenticeship system). Looking back, it was a very effective way of making you feel like yuou are part not only of the company, but also the people who work there.

My later jobs used the approach D.X. described in another thread; someone is supposed to show you the ropes, but three days after you start they are on sick leave, a month later they have quit, and you have to 'make do' with what you know. Sure, you learn a lot that way, but it doesn't build any particular attachment to your workplace.
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