Page 1 of 1

Recruiters

PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2005 4:59 pm
by Scott David
Was is the opinion of using recruiters as a job-seeking tool for a PhD-level biotech position?? Are there any downsides?? Would I get more out of my current job search of surfing appropriate web sites (good job boards, company sites) and my own networking?? Are recruiters aware of positions that I don't even know about - not advertised?? Thanks in advance.

Recruiters

PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2005 5:19 pm
by Dave Jensen
Hi Scott,

I'll take off my recruiter hat and post as a regular joe :)

If you are a fresh PhD (and we don't know because you have no personal page for us to look at), companies several years ago stopped using recruiters for those kinds of entry level positions. There are still "temp" firm recruiters who get calls for these jobs, and a lot of newbie recruiters who make calls about ads they see because they think they can make a buck by sending in CV's to a company that has advertised an opening. For the most part, companies find their new PhD's (0-2 years of experience) via the networking process, and of course advertising. Make a couple of recruiter contacts if you'd like, but then put the focus of your job search on networking and following up on ads that fit you well.

If you have industry experience, however, you should be getting calls from recruiters who are charged with finding someone at Company B to place at Company A. In that case, recruiters can be VERY valuable contacts (the good ones). You'll need to ask around about who values what recruiting firms -- have your friends in industry suggest some names.

When you approach a recruiter, do so under very specific terms. Don't let them talk you into allowing them to send your CV whereever they want. Instead, have them agree to contact you BEFORE any resume or CV submittal to a client. That way, if you've already made direct contact with a firm, you are not going to muddy the water with a recruiter trying to present you at the same time. THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT. It is the only way to stay "in charge" of your job search. (Who do you want to be in charge, someone sitting at a phone in a recruiting office or YOU).

Dave Jensen, Moderator

Recruiters

PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2005 6:29 pm
by Cory
Hi,

One of the things that I wonder about in this discussion of recruiters is the apparent increase in the use of recruting agencies by major industrial employers.

Is the traditional HR function inside companies being replaced by outside contractors? I think there is some anecdotal evidence that this is the case when you look at job postings.

Then, if this is the case, how does this change the strategy for the potential candidate looking for a job?


Recruiters

PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2005 6:53 pm
by Dave Jensen
Hello A.

To my knowledge, there has been a DECREASE in the use of recruiters by industrial employers. You may be referring to the phenomenon of the "in house" recruiter, which is unique and something that only happens in the biggest (ala Merck, J&J) employers. This is where a company like Kelly puts a recruiter or two into the client's offices, where they are responsible for filling some positions as well as working with the H/R needs of those employees contracted under the firm.

Dave Jensen, Moderator

Recruiters

PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2005 12:37 pm
by Maureen
Scott,

My experience with recruiters is that although nothing panned out from sending them a resume etc.. it was very nice to get a warm body on the phone occaisionally. One recruiter gave me pointers on my resume and discussed the going rate for salaries for new PhDs. Several others, just by virtue of talking to them, helped me develop my two minute speal about who I am and what I am looking for and practice with phone interviewing. Don't expect much in terms of actually getting a PhD level job through a recruiter, but they are great sources of information and I recommend calling a few. Especially when things start to look bleak and you are frustrated with a lack of response from endless web-site resume submissions. At the very least, you will get a response and from that you can figure out how to sell yourself better. At the very best, you may time it perfectly for a great opportunity.

Good luck!

Recruiters

PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2005 12:52 pm
by Dave Jensen
Maureen said, "Don't expect much in terms of actually getting a PhD level job through a recruiter, but they are great sources of information and I recommend calling a few."

I agree with this. When times get tough, call a recruiter. At least you'll be "live" on the phone with someone who can offer you advice. I never understood how I can do this forum work for more than a decade and yet no one calls me :(

Maureen's comments show how important it is NOT to get "sucked into the Internet job search." To just sit there, day after day, hoping that someone answers your company application, or digs your resume out of an online web database. It's really important to actually talk to people. Recruiters can be a trap as well, because its easy to talk to these companies, but their ability to assist you is ENTIRELY predicated on their assignments. Make your contact with them brief, get one or two questions answered, find out what kinds of projects they take on, and only send your CV if you have an agreement with them that they won't share it with their clients without your advance permission.

I disagree with Maureen that they don't fill PhD jobs. I've rarely filled one that ISN'T.

Dave Jensen, Moderator