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Why do companies prefer "locals"?

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Why do companies prefer

Postby Annie L. » Thu Oct 28, 2004 10:31 am

Although I appreciate all the advice, moving to Boston is very important to me. I have never "lied" and am not going to start now. The address I am now using is a Boston address, which isn't lying, because I tell them when I call that I am moving up there soon. I can't "start local." There is no biotech in my area, or aat least very little.

Thanks for all the helpful advice. I really feel it is more optimistic than some of you point out . . . Let you know what happens!
Annie L.
 

Why do companies prefer

Postby Bryan » Thu Nov 04, 2004 2:46 pm

Annie,

Thanks for this thread...I asked the same question a month ago (See "Proximity" thread). I have 2 years postdoc experience, live in Baltimore, and I'm from Seattle. I consider myself a strong candidate for entry-level "methods/assay development" positions, which has been the focus of a nationwide job search for about 5 months. It has yielded interviews, but only nearby, and mostly in Maryland.

Other people talked about honesty regarding the CV address. Honesty is even more crucial in an interview. In each one, someone interviewing me asked a question about how I feel about living so far away from family, why I want to work in that particular cookie cutter northeastern megalopolis suburban business park, or something of that nature. My standard answer is that the opportunity to participate in the great work being done by company X is more important to me than where I live. That is quite true--my work is very important to me. However, I absolutely would rather move back home to work for some company Y even if company Y's work were a tad less great than company X's. Questions like these got me into trouble in at least two of the nine face-to-face interviews I've had, to the point where I suspect it may have been the main or sole reason I didn't get a job in Baltimore that was down to me and one other candidate. That job would have been perfect for my career at this stage, it was at a company I have specifically always wanted to work for, I believed I would have loved it and excelled at it, and I need the money and the lower cost of living here. But I've since realized none of that matters at all. If you're not true to yourself, the HR manager will notice (it's their job) and after that your pants may as well be on fire. This is the main reason I've decided to "roll the dice" as Dave said, move back home (where I have only lived 9 months in the last 14 years and I have no "network" yet), and keep trying from there. It's a huge economic risk, but the potential upside is also huge.
Bryan
 

Why do companies prefer

Postby Dave Jensen » Thu Nov 04, 2004 4:22 pm

Bryan,

An excellent post and very helpful as to how companies pursue this issue during the interview. I'm sure you've assisted many people, and urge you to check back with us and let us know how the search has gone,

Best of luck,

Dave
"Failure is a bruise -- not a tattoo." -- Jon Sinclair
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Why do companies prefer

Postby Robert » Thu Nov 11, 2004 11:18 am

I am in the converse situation. I am unable to relocate and live in a state with several Big Pharmas. I have "excellent discovery skills" as I have been told by several colleagues in industry & good publicaitons, but I am unable to even get my CV noticed and after 12 months of looking, I've not even been contacted once for a phone interview. My CV has even been hand delivered to hiring managers by colleagues.
Robert
 

Why do companies prefer locals

Postby Dave Jensen » Thu Nov 11, 2004 2:21 pm

Robert,

I'd say that there is a CV problem in this situation. Because we can not really diagnose these problems on this site, we may not be able to help you.

Make certain that you are not using an academic CV, that you have an objectives statement, that there are no typos or spelling errors, and that you have a really dynamite cover letter attached with the focus on specific accomplishments that fit the needs of the companies in your area.

Continue to develop those internal contacts in the companies you want to work for . . . they are paid a bonus if you are hired, so there is absolutely no reason why they wouldn't want to help you.

Are you still in an academic environment? If so, is there a career center on site that you can go to for some resume advice?

Dave
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Why do companies prefer locals

Postby Bill L. & Naledi S. » Fri Nov 12, 2004 7:57 pm

If you ARE using an academic CV and need help converting it to an industry-style resume, here's a link to a powerpoint tutorial, and some samples that might help you in that process.

CV's Academic to Industry


Best wishes --
Bill L. and Naledi S.
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