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BS in Physics

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BS in Physics

Postby Kevin » Wed Jan 05, 2005 1:49 am

Today was the first time I have visited this forum and already I have found enough info to give me new hope in my search for a job.

Here is my situation: graduated May 2004 with a BS in Physics, have been looking for a job ever since.

Like many others who have posted I have sent out numerous applications and have only heard back once. I am finally biting the bullet and trying the networking route.

The main problem I have now is, where does one work with a B.S. in Physics and are there opportunities without a M.S. or PhD? I find that at the B.S. level most openings are for engineering positions in the aerospace, defense, electronics industries, etc. that are also accepting physicists. I have no problem with this, but I just want to make sure I'm not missing something. Thank you all any advice and for the many helpful bits of info already posted in other threads.
Kevin
 

BS in Physics

Postby Val » Wed Jan 05, 2005 3:22 am


I am a PhD-qualified physicist who pretends to be a BS-qualified electronics engineer. I sell myself to the industrial employers as a developer of physics- and mathematics-heavy instrumentation complete with electronics. Because the emphasize in the electronics is on proper functioning and not on design, I am able to get away with not using/knowing the complex EE tools for designing of printed circuit boards (PCB) or for analyzing/modelling of electronic circuits (such as SPICE).

It occurs to me that the employment opportunities for physicists in the US are more abundant. Possible occupations are mentioned in the Dave Jensen-initiated thread "Less Frequently Discussed Jobs in Industry", http://www2.sciencecareers.org/forum/view.php?id=1231

Regards,
Val

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BS in Physics

Postby Val » Wed Jan 05, 2005 3:31 am

I forgot to mention how I arrived to be a physicist-turned-electronics-engineer. Simple. "It is not what you know, it is who you know." I met an older colleague of mine, also an immigrant physicist. He became a mentor to me. He did this transition himself, and he mentored me on the advantages of such a transition and how to write a corresponding CV. But as I gained more of work experience over the past years, I realised that he had a natural inclination to building electronics, and he followed that path... which was not necessarily my inclination and my path. I realised that industrial/govt lab employers favor the employees who are versed both in experiment and theory, and this is the skill/image which I am set to develop now.

I hope this foray into someone else mind will give you more idea about how things happen in the "real world".

Regards,
Val
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BS in Physics

Postby Kevin » Wed Jan 12, 2005 3:04 pm

Val,

Thank you for your advice. Sure enough, as soon as I started networking I began to get more call backs and will have my first interview sometime next week (interestingly, it too is in the electronics industry.) It's amazing what a difference it makes.
Kevin
 


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